CUED Publications database

Comparison of the strain-softening behaviour of conventional vibrated concrete and self-compacting concrete

Desnerck, P and De Schutter, G and Taerwe, L (2010) Comparison of the strain-softening behaviour of conventional vibrated concrete and self-compacting concrete. In: UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

Strain-softening is the phenomenon by which the compressive stress-strain curve presents a descending branch after the peak stress has been reached. For high-strength concrete types it is known that failure occurs in a more brittle way, resulting in a steeper descending branch and a smaller area underneath. Almost no test results are available describing the stress-strain behaviour of self-compacting concrete (a concrete type which needs no additional vibration energy to be compacted). Therefore different concrete types, self-compacting concretes as well a conventional vibrated concrete are investigated in this study. Uniaxial compressive tests are performed on cylinders. The control signal was adjusted to a combination of the axial and circumferential strain. In this way the total stress-strain curve has been recorded in a stable way. From the results it can be seen that the peak strain corresponding with the compressive strength of the material is higher for self-compacting concrete than for conventional vibrated concrete of the same strength. The descending branch of the stress-strain curve appears to be less steep for SCC resulting in a higher toughness.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (UNSPECIFIED)
Subjects: UNSPECIFIED
Divisions: Div D > Structures
Depositing User: Cron Job
Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2019 23:29
Last Modified: 12 Nov 2020 10:43
DOI: