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Syllable language models for Mandarin speech recognition: exploiting character language models.

Liu, X and Hieronymus, JL and Gales, MJ and Woodland, PC (2013) Syllable language models for Mandarin speech recognition: exploiting character language models. J Acoust Soc Am, 133. pp. 519-528.

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Abstract

Mandarin Chinese is based on characters which are syllabic in nature and morphological in meaning. All spoken languages have syllabiotactic rules which govern the construction of syllables and their allowed sequences. These constraints are not as restrictive as those learned from word sequences, but they can provide additional useful linguistic information. Hence, it is possible to improve speech recognition performance by appropriately combining these two types of constraints. For the Chinese language considered in this paper, character level language models (LMs) can be used as a first level approximation to allowed syllable sequences. To test this idea, word and character level n-gram LMs were trained on 2.8 billion words (equivalent to 4.3 billion characters) of texts from a wide collection of text sources. Both hypothesis and model based combination techniques were investigated to combine word and character level LMs. Significant character error rate reductions up to 7.3% relative were obtained on a state-of-the-art Mandarin Chinese broadcast audio recognition task using an adapted history dependent multi-level LM that performs a log-linearly combination of character and word level LMs. This supports the hypothesis that character or syllable sequence models are useful for improving Mandarin speech recognition performance.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Decision Trees Humans Linear Models Pattern Recognition, Automated Phonetics Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted Speech Acoustics Speech Recognition Software
Subjects: UNSPECIFIED
Divisions: Div F > Machine Intelligence
Depositing User: Cron Job
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 11:29
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2014 01:09
DOI: 10.1121/1.4768800

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