CUED Publications database

Excess pore pressures around underground structures following earthquake induced liquefaction

Chian, SC and Madabhushi, SPG (2012) Excess pore pressures around underground structures following earthquake induced liquefaction. International Journal of Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, 3. pp. 25-41. ISSN 1947-8488

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Abstract

Underground structures located in liquefiable soil deposits are susceptible to floatation following an earthquake event due to their lower unit weight relative to the surrounding saturated soil. This inherent buoyancy may cause lightweight structures to float when the soil liquefies. Centrifuge tests have been carried out to study the excess pore pressure generation and dissipation in liquefiable soils. In these tests, near full liquefaction conditions were attained within a few cycles of the earthquake loading. In the case of high hydraulic conductivity sands, significant dissipation could take place even during the earthquake loading which inhibits full liquefaction from occurring. In the case of excess pore pressure generation and dissipation around a floating structure, the cyclic response of the structure may lead to the reduction in excess pore pressure near the face of the structure as compared to the far field. This reduction in excess pore pressure is due to shear-induced dilation and suction pressures arising from extensile stresses at the soil-structure interface. Given the lower excess pore pressure around the structure; the soil around the structure retains a portion of this shear strength which in turn can discourage significant uplift of the underground structure. Copyright © 2012, IGI Global.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Centrifuge modelling Floatation Liquefaction Pore pressures Soil-structure interaction Underground structures
Subjects: UNSPECIFIED
Divisions: Div D > Geotechnical and Environmental
Depositing User: Cron Job
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2014 11:46
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2014 02:19
DOI: 10.4018/jgee.2012070103